About US

Power to the people

The People’s Parity Project is a nationwide network of law students and new attorneys organizing to unrig the legal system and build a justice system that values people over profits.

As law students, we believe we have a responsibility to demystify—and dismantle—the coercive legal tools that have stacked the system against the people. We’re fighting for a justice system that works for working people, especially workers of color, women, and low-wage, precarious, immigrant, disabled, and LGBTQ+ workers. Join us!

Why We Care

Our legal system is supposed to protect workers and consumers, and hold the powerful accountable when they break the rules. Today, corporations use their economic power to force workers and consumers to sign away their rights, with virtually no judicial oversight.

The vast majority of American consumers and non-union workers are subject to forced arbitration agreements and class-action waivers that block them from going to court when their rights are violated.

Even when workers and consumers can get into the courtroom, they can’t fight for their rights on a fair and equal playing field. Corporate judges—often hand-picked by the Federalist Society and the Chamber of Commerce—shield corporations from accountability for covering up sexual harassment, ripping off consumers, or stealing workers’ wages.

Who We Are

The heart of PPP is our chapters on over a dozen law school campuses from Hartford, Connecticut, to San Antonio, Texas. We also have working groups of law students and attorneys across the country fighting to unrig the courts, build worker power, and more. Our work is supported by our staff, Board of Directors, and Advisory Council.

Our Financials

Staff

Molly Coleman

Executive Director

Molly Coleman is a co-founder of PPP and the organization’s first Executive Director. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where she served as Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review in addition to working for a number of legal organizations committed to advancing justice for the most marginalized. Prior to law school, Molly spent three years with City Year New York, working to close the opportunity gap for students in Harlem and the Bronx and to empower young people to become civically engaged leaders.

Molly’s work with PPP is regularly featured in national outlets, including the New York Times, the Washington PostNew York Magazine, Business Insider, and elsewhere. Her writing has appeared in The American Prospect, Bloomberg Law, Teen Vogue, the Minnesota Reformer, among other outlets.

Molly is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin – Madison, and a native of Saint Paul, Minnesota.

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Tristin Brown

Policy & Program Director

Prior to becoming the Policy & Program Director at PPP, Tristin Brown was an Associate Counsel at the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs. She first joined the Committee as the Small, Webber, Spencer Litigation Fellow of the Georgetown Women’s Law & Public Policy Fellowship Program. Tristin graduated summa cum laude from Florida A&M University with a B.S. in Public Relations, and earned her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. At Georgetown, Tristin was the President of the Black Law Students Association, a Public Interest Fellow, Student Ambassador, and Online Editor and Special Projects Chair of the Georgetown Journal of Law & Modern Critical Race Perspectives. She was also recognized as a Pro Bono Pledge Honoree and Dean’s Certificate recipient for her special and outstanding service to the Law Center community, and elected by her peers to represent her class as a 2019 student commencement speaker. Additionally, at Georgetown, Ms. Brown represented clients in the DC Superior Court as a student attorney in the Domestic Violence Clinic. She has held externships with the Political Law Group of Perkins Coie LLP, Advancement Project and the litigation division of the Federal Election Commission. In 2018, she was selected as a Ms. JD Fellow. Prior to attending Georgetown, Ms. Brown worked as a staffer for former U.S. Congresswoman Gwen Graham and interned for U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, former U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation.

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Steve Kennedy

Organizing & Network Director

Steve Kennedy is PPP’s Organizing and Network Director and an evening student at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where he founded his campus’s chapter of PPP. Prior to joining PPP, Steve worked as a fellow with Greater Hartford Legal Aid and Connecticut Veterans Legal Center and a law clerk at The Flood Law Firm. Steve was also the Connecticut Team Leader for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, where he led significant organizing and advocacy efforts. Before deciding to pursue a legal career, Steve was a structural biologist and served in the U.S. Army airborne infantry. He received his M.S. from New York University and his B.S. from the University of Massachusetts Boston.

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Board of Directors

Niko Bowie

Niko Bowie

Nikolas Bowie is an assistant professor of law at Harvard Law School. He is a historian who teaches and writes about federal and state constitutional law and local government law. His current research interests include critical legal histories of federal immigration law, noncitizen voting, and the separation of powers.

In addition to teaching and writing, Professor Bowie litigates criminal and civil appeals. He is on the board of Lawyers for Civil Rights, which advocates on behalf of immigrants and people of color; MassVote, which advocates for voting rights and election reform; and People’s Parity Project, which organizes law students and lawyers to build a justice system that values people over profits. He sits on the City of Cambridge’s planning board, which applies and recommends changes to the city’s zoning ordinance. He is also an avid marathoner.

Professor Bowie received a BA in history from Yale and a JD and PhD in history from Harvard. Between law school and graduate school, Professor Bowie clerked for Judge Jeffrey Sutton of the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and Justice Sonia Sotomayor of the US Supreme Court.

Rachel Deutsch

Rachel Deutsch

Center for Popular Democracy

Rachel supports CPD’s campaigns to enact and enforce strong workplace protections. She is a nationally recognized expert on the design and implementation of Fair Workweek policies to promote stable, predictable schedules and opportunities for full-time employment. Rachel also leads CPD’s wage theft prevention work to improve compliance with a broad array of wage & hour, health and safety, and paid leave protections, and supports CPD’s work to envision new forms of worker organization and collective action. Before joining CPD, Rachel litigated cases involving labor and employment, elections, state and local governments, and environmental protection at Strumwasser & Woocher, a public interest law firm. Rachel previously clerked for Hon. Marsha S. Berzon on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and before law school, organized hospital workers with the Service Employees International Union. Rachel is a graduate of Columbia Law School and Yale College, and lives in Los Angeles.

LiJia Gong

LiJia Gong

Co-Chair

LiJia is the Policy and Legal Director at Local Progress. She leads the development of Local Progress’ policy and research capacity to support members and drives the development and growth of national program areas.

LiJia is an attorney with over a decade of experience in policy, litigation, and political strategy. Prior to joining Local Progress, she served as Counsel at Public Rights Project, an organization that empowers local and state governments to advance civil rights, worker and consumer rights, and environmental justice. At Public Rights Project, she launched a partnership with Local Solutions Support Center to fight abusive state preemption of local policymaking. LiJia has worked on the 2018 campaign to re-elect Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and served as a law clerk for Judge Kiyo Matsumoto of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. Prior to becoming a lawyer, LiJia worked as a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors.

LiJia earned her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and her B.S.F.S. from Georgetown University. She immigrated to the United States from China at age 5, grew up in Maryland, and currently resides in Brooklyn, NY with her husband (Andrew) and cat (Wilma).

Vail Kohnert-Yount

Vail Kohnert-Yount

Treasurer

Vail Kohnert-Yount is from Houston, Texas. She graduated from Georgetown University and Harvard Law School, where she co-founded PPP. Before law school, she worked at the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor and at the U.S. Department of Labor. She is now a Skadden Fellow at Texas RioGrande Legal Aid in Brownsville, Texas, representing low-wage workers who have experienced wage theft, harassment, and discrimination. She is a long-time volunteer with Jane’s Due Process, which helps pregnant and parenting Texas minors access abortion and other civil rights.

Jacob Lipton

Jacob Lipton

Co-Chair

Jacob Lipton is the Associate Director of Justice Catalyst, where he works on a wide range of projects including managing the Fellowship Program. Before joining Justice Catalyst, Jacob was the founding Program Director of the Systemic Justice Project at Harvard Law School. He also serves on the board of the ACLU of Massachusetts.

Jacob graduated from Harvard Law School, where he was co-Editor in Chief of Unbound: Harvard Journal of the Legal Left and Vice President of Harvard Law School Students for Sustainable Investment, and the captain of the Harvard Law School soccer team. Before law school he read Classics at King’s College London and spent two years in Freetown as the Special Advisor to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Government of Sierra Leone. 

Anna Prakash

Anna Prakash

Anna P. Prakash is a partner at the Nichols Kaster law firm in Minneapolis, where she is one of the leaders of the firm’s Civil Rights and Impact Litigation practice group. Her practice aims to tackle discrimination and the unjust imbalance of power across numerous settings and bring about meaningful change on behalf of those harmed by corporate or governmental wrongdoing. She focuses on complex class and multi-plaintiff actions, no matter where the underlying issues arise. As a result, Anna handles a wide variety of cases, including those involving public schools, employment, prisons, loans, and consumer transactions. She has represented thousands of class members in courts around the country. Over the course of her time at the firm, Anna has led the firm’s National Consumer Class Action practice group, been a member of the firm’s National Wage & Hour practice group, authored and argued class and individual appeals at the state and federal level, and worked consistently to pursue just causes and obtain meaningful relief on behalf of her clients.

Anna is also involved in numerous professional organizations. She is the current employee-side cochair of the American Bar Association’s Occupational Safety and Health Committee, sits on the Nominating Committee for the National Association of Consumer Advocates, is a member of the Professional Development Committee of Twin Cities Diversity in Practice, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Public Justice Foundation, a nationwide charitable organization supporting high-impact lawsuits to combat social and economic injustice. Anna is a frequent speaker at national legal seminars, an adjunct professor of legal writing at the University of Minnesota Law School, and a past board member of the Minnesota Chapter of the National Employment Lawyers’ Association, as well as Standpoint, an organization that exists to serve domestic and sexual violence survivors, advocates, attorneys, and other professionals working within the justice system in Minnesota. Prior to joining Nichols Kaster, Anna served as an attorney for the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and monitored special education compliance for the State of Minnesota.

David Seligman

David Seligman

David has been the Executive Director of Towards Justice since 2018 and previously was Litigation Counsel with the organization. At Towards Justice, David has litigated several class and collective actions to attack systematic injustices in the labor market, including serving as lead counsel in the first antitrust case to challenge “no hire” provisions in franchise agreements among fast-food franchisees and several cases challenging the misclassification of workers. During the COVID-19 pandemic, David has been lead counsel or co-lead counsel in several large-scale cases brought by warehouse and meatpacking workers seeking to enforce public health guidance within their workplaces.

David also supports advocates, organizers, workers and consumers seeking policy reforms at the state and local level on a range of economic justice issues. He writes and speaks regularly on forced arbitration, including before state legislatures considering reforms that could mitigate the harms of forced arbitration, on the intersection of labor and antitrust laws, and on workplace health and safety issues.

Prior to his work at Towards Justice, David was a staff attorney at the National Consumer Law Center, working on forced arbitration and predatory auto lending. While there, he authored the Model State Consumer and Employee Justice Enforcement Act, which provides states with tools to mitigate some of the harms that forced arbitration causes low-income consumers and workers. David remains a contributing author for the National Consumer Law Center, where he authors the organization’s treatise on the enforceability of forced arbitration clauses and class waivers.

In 2020, David was awarded the Rising Star Award by the National Consumer Law Center. The award honors an attorney or attorneys (in practice for 15 years or less) who made major contributions to consumer law within the past two years. David was also co-lead counsel in Solis v. Circle Group, a class action challenging the misclassification and underpayment of hundreds of immigrant drywall workers that won honors as the Colorado Plaintiffs’ Employment Lawyers Case of the Year in 2018.

David clerked for Chief Judge Patti B. Saris of the District of Massachusetts and Judges Robert D. Sack and Susan L. Carney of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. David is a graduate of Williams College and Harvard Law School.

Anne Tewksbury

Anne Tewksbury

Anne Tewksbury is a student at NYU School of Law, where she studies labor & employment law. She has worked for the Center for Popular Democracy, organizing unemployed workers around COVID-19 relief and researching unemployment insurance reform. At NYU, Anne is a leader of Law Students for Economic Justice (which houses NYU’s chapter of the People’s Parity Project) and the Environmental Law Society, and she serves as a Staff Editor on the NYU Review of Law and Social Change. She graduated from Williams College in 2016.

ADVISORY COUNCIL

Deepak Gupta

Deepak Gupta

Gupta Wessler PLLC

Deepak Gupta is the founding principal of Gupta Wessler PLLC, where he focuses on Supreme Court, appellate, and complex litigation. He is also a lecturer at Harvard Law School and has previously taught at Georgetown and American universities. Deepak regularly appears before the U.S. Supreme Court. In 2010, he argued AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, a landmark arbitration case, and has since played a leading role in the debate over forced arbitration clauses.

Kalpana Kotagal

Kalpana Kotagal

Cohen Milstein

Kalpana Kotagal is a Partner at Cohen Milstein, a member of the firm’s Civil Rights & Employment practice group, and Chair of the firm’s Hiring and Diversity Committee. Ms. Kotagal plays an active role in the investigation and development of new matters for the Civil Rights & Employment practice group. Ms. Kotagal is co-author of the “Inclusion Rider,” referenced by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand in her 2018 Best Actress acceptance speech, together with Dr. Stacy Smith of the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative and Fanshen Cox of Pearl Street Films.

Jahan Sagafi

Jahan Sagafi

Outten & Golden

Jahan C. Sagafi is the partner-in-charge of the firm’s San Francisco office, where he represents workers in employment class actions challenging discrimination, wage and hour abuses, Fair Credit Reporting Act violations, and other types of exploitation. He has won a jury trial for a nationwide class of approximately 1,000 technical support workers, an en banc appeal in the Ninth Circuit, and many settlements to recover backpay for overtime compensation, meal and rest breaks, vacation benefits, discriminatory pay and promotion gaps, and more.

Myriam Gilles

Myriam Gilles

Cardozo Law School

Myriam Gilles specializes in class actions and aggregate litigation, and has written extensively on class action waivers in arbitration clauses. She also writes on structural reform litigation and tort law. She is the fifth most cited civil procedure professor in the country. Her articles have appeared in top law reviews, including Chicago, Columbia, Michigan, and Penn. Professor Gilles teaches Torts, Products Liability, Class Actions & Aggregate Litigation. She has testified before Congress on consumer protections. Professor Gilles served as Cardozo’s vice dean from 2016 to 2018. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Virginia Law School and in 2005-06, was a fellow in the Program of Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University.

Amy Kapczynski

Amy Kapczynski

Yale Law School

Amy Kapczynski is a Professor of Law at Yale Law School, Faculty Co-Director of the Global Health Justice Partnership, and Faculty Co-Director of the Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency. She is also Faculty Co-Director of the Law and Political Economy Project and cofounder of the Law and Political Economy blog. She joined the Yale Law faculty in January 2012. Her areas of research include information policy, intellectual property law, international law, and global health. Prior to coming to Yale, she taught at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. She also served as a law clerk to Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Stephen G. Breyer at the U.S. Supreme Court, and to Judge Guido Calabresi on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Jennifer Bennett

Jennifer Bennett

Gupta Wessler

Jennifer Bennett is a principal at Gupta Wessler PLLC, where she focuses on cutting-edge public interest and plaintiffs’-side appellate litigation. Her practice covers a wide range of issues including civil rights, consumer protection, constitutional law, workers’ rights, and government transparency. Jennifer clerked for the Honorable Marsha Berzon of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the Honorable Jesse Furman of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, and the Honorable Vince Chhabria of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, and earned her J.D. from Yale Law School and her B.A. from Yale University. Before joining Gupta Wessler, she was an attorney at Public Justice in Oakland, California, where she also focused on cutting-edge public interest appellate litigation.

Chris Kang

Chris Kang

Demand Justice

Chris is Chief Counsel of Demand Justice, a new advocacy organization empowering citizens to organize around our nation’s courts and fighting for progressive change because the rights described in our Constitution are only made real through the power of citizen activism. He has been an ACS Board member since 2016. Chris served in the Obama White House for nearly seven years—as Deputy Counsel and Deputy Assistant to the President; Senior Counsel to the President; and Special Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs. He oversaw the selection, vetting, and confirmation of more than 220 of the president’s judicial nominees—who set records for the most people of color, women, and openly gay and lesbian judges appointed by a president.

Sandeep Vaheesan

Sandeep Vaheesan

Open Markets Institute

Sandeep Vaheesan is legal director at the Open Markets Institute. Vaheesan previously served as a regulations counsel at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, where he helped develop and draft the first comprehensive federal rule on payday, vehicle title, and high-cost installment loans. Vaheesan has published articles and essays on a variety of topics in antitrust law, including the relationship between antitrust and workers and the political content of antitrust. His writing has appeared in the Berkeley Business Law Journal, Harvard Law & Policy Review, Nebraska Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, and Yale Law Journal Forum. He received a B.A. from the University of Maryland and a J.D. and M.A. from Duke University.

 

Bradley Girard

Bradley Girard

Americans United for Separation of Church & State

Bradley Girard is Litigation Counsel at Americans United for Separation of Church and State. His practice is primarily appellate and Supreme Court litigation, focusing on the First Amendment, appellate and civil procedure, employment, and representation of those on the losing side of society’s power imbalances. Bradley clerked for Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey on the Sixth Circuit and Judge Neal E. Kravitz on D.C. Superior Court, and he was the clinical teaching fellow at Georgetown Law’s Appellate Courts Immersion Clinic. 

 

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